IF: Gathering: A Biblical Evaluation

Normally when my daughter, Jess, posts on her Anchor for the Soul Facebook page, I will repost on my page over there and then wait a few days (and sometimes a few weeks) to post it here on the blog. However, what you find written here today was on her page late last night. I knew I wanted to get this information into your hands as soon as possible. This IF movement has a lot of steam and is very popular and their gathering is coming up soon.

Although you may already be aware that something is off with this movement, you may not be sure how to discuss this with the women in your life who adore it. What you find written here will easily explain why all biblically sound Christian women should stay far, far away from the IF:Gathering.

I hope what Jess writes below is a blessing to you as you seek to please the Lord above all else and to be a light for Him in the ever-darkening, false religion that they call “Christianity”.

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The IF: Gathering was founded by Jennie Allen in 2014. The name is inspired by the question, “If God is real…then what?” and exists to “equip women to fulfill their calling.” It’s a weekend conference that women can attend in-person or livestream with a group in their home or local church. I’ve received a few questions about the gathering and since IF: 2022 is coming up in 2 weeks, I thought it was a good time to answer them. Is it biblically sound? Is it something we can benefit from or something to be avoided? I researched each speaker at the gathering and found an easy – and discouraging – answer.

Before we begin, I’m assuming these 7 things about you as a reader. If you agree with them, then you will absolutely share my concerns over the list of speakers and what they preach and believe.

1. Women aren’t permitted to preach in church (1 Tim 2:12-14)
2. Social justice isn’t a Biblical concept and we can’t seek to resolve racism in any way apart from the Gospel changing individual hearts.
3. Direct revelation from God is no longer occurring. (Rev 22:18)
4. The NAR (New Apostolic Reformation) and Prosperity Gospel movements are unbiblical and must be avoided.
5. We do not seek to unify with other faiths or denominations that compromise the truth. Truth always trumps unity. (Matt 10:34)
6. Dominion theology is false. The Bible is clear that the world will become worse and worse, not better, as the last days approach.
7. There should be no partnering with false teachers (Romans 16:17, 2 John 9-11)

J𝐞𝐧𝐧𝐢𝐞 𝐀𝐥𝐥𝐞𝐧 – founder of the IF gathering, the idea was born after she heard a “voice from the sky” (that she attributes to God) telling her to gather and equip her generation. She’s a proponent of extra-biblical revelation, spiritual formation practices, unity over truth, women pastors, and dominion theology. Her dream guide states that “when we create and thrive for the good of others, you’re participating in God’s redemptive work of making the world better.” Her end goal always seems to be making the world a better place. What speaks the loudest against her, however, is those she invites to speak at the IF: Gathering.

𝐂𝐡𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐞 𝐂𝐚𝐢𝐧𝐞 – an ordained pastor who preaches at various churches across the globe. She is rooted in the NAR and the prosperity gospel. She calls Joyce Meyer her spiritual mentor and “prayed for an impartation of that teaching anointing and revelation” as she placed her hand on Meyer’s Bible. Her association with false teachers is inexcusable – she is officially part of the Hillsong church and has partnered with Joel Osteen, Paula White, TD Jakes, Beth Moore, and many others.

𝐉𝐞𝐟𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐀𝐥𝐲𝐬𝐬𝐚 𝐁𝐞𝐭𝐡𝐤𝐞 – they are proponents of ecumenism (especially the joining of Catholicism and Christianity), social justice, and dominion theology. Jefferson stated that the book of Revelation is simply “apocalyptic literature showing the evil of empire versus the goodness of the reign of God.” He’s partnered with multiple false teachers.

𝐌𝐚𝐭𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐋𝐚𝐮𝐫𝐞𝐧 𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐧𝐝𝐥𝐞𝐫 – Matt has recently jumped on the charismatic bandwagon, preaching about visions or “spiritual impressions” and our requirement to share those with others as a “word from the Lord.” He’s also a champion of social justice, often talking about white privilege and the inconsistencies and ignorance within the white church. He preached about the need for affirmative action within the church. He berates those who criticize CRT or the Black Lives Matter movement – claiming “their brains are broke” and that they’ve “given up on justice.” He believes God can eliminate racism as we partner with the world to reform the broken system.

𝐋𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐚 𝐌𝐨𝐫𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐧 – at a CRU event in 2019, she led a prayer to the stadium full of people where they repeated a prayer of lament for white privilege and systematic injustice in which they were “compliant.” Her book, 𝐵𝑒 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝐵𝑟𝑖𝑑𝑔𝑒, claims that Christians refuse to actively repent for their failure “to be a credible witness of racial reconciliation.” She claims we all need to “explore our family’s history to discover ways in which you or your ancestors have been complicit in racism” and then make reparations for that. She says that guilt and shame are “communal” and that it’s a sin to benefit from structural privilege. She never talks about the gospel as being the only true solution.

𝐆𝐚𝐛𝐞 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐑𝐞𝐛𝐞𝐤𝐚𝐡 𝐋𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐬 – founder of “Q”, an organization that attempts to unite Christianity and other faith groups to bring about change through the “seven channels of cultural influence.” The organization has partnered with false teachers and many from the Catholic church. Gabe Lyons commended the IF: Gathering for “not getting into doctrine” especially over women’s roles within the church.

𝐉𝐚𝐜𝐤𝐢 𝐇𝐢𝐥𝐥 𝐏𝐞𝐫𝐫𝐲 – a popular Christian figure who is slowly drifting away from Biblical theology. She has recently recanted her participation in “the American Gospel” (a documentary showing the falsity of the prosperity gospel) saying that she “deeply dislikes the tribalism and theological superiority those types of films encourage.” She’s become a proponent for Social Justice and has defended her partnership with Bethel, Hillsong, and other false teachers.

𝐒𝐚𝐝𝐢𝐞 𝐑𝐨𝐛𝐞𝐫𝐭𝐬𝐨𝐧 𝐇𝐮𝐟𝐟 – a rising star in the Christian world, she speaks a very me-centered Gospel. She talks a lot about your worth, dreams, goals, confidence, and the importance of “being you” and very little about sin, repentance, and denying yourself. God is all love and no judgement.

𝐀𝐧𝐧 𝐕𝐨𝐬𝐤𝐚𝐦𝐩 – in her book, she says she “flies to Paris to discover how to make love to God.” She writes that “God makes love with grace upon grace, every moment a making of His love for us. Couldn’t I make love to God, making every moment love for Him? To know Him the way Adam knew Eve, Spirit skin to spirit skin?” The rest of the book is filled with similar verbiage. Besides this abominable erotic language toward a holy God, she is a big proponent for new-age and Catholic-influenced mysticism and believes that God is in all things (panentheism).

𝐃𝐫. 𝐀𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐚 𝐏𝐡𝐢𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐩𝐬 – a psychologist specializing in trauma, she has partnered with TD Jakes and spoke at his “Woman Thou are Loosed” conference. She hosted a black-only gathering for racial trauma at Saddleback Church and has also partnered with Oprah. She promotes social justice and CRT and has terrible theology all around.

𝐓𝐨𝐧𝐢 𝐂𝐨𝐥𝐥𝐢𝐞𝐫 – co-pastor of the Hillsong Atlanta church, she originally served at Andy Stanley’s church and has expressed her admiration for him. Proponent of social justice and the NAR movement.

𝐋𝐚𝐲𝐥𝐚 𝐃𝐞 𝐋𝐚 𝐆𝐚𝐫𝐳𝐚 – pastor of a church in Mexico and is “passionate about creating churches that unchurched people love to attend.”

𝐉𝐚𝐝𝐚 𝐄𝐝𝐰𝐚𝐫𝐝𝐬 – another pastor who previously attended Tony Evan’s church where she has returned to preach on occasion.

𝐉𝐚𝐦𝐢𝐞 𝐈𝐯𝐞𝐲 – she has a podcast that hosts a variety of questionable guests including Beth Moore, Russell Moore, Mike Todd, Max Lucado, and Amy Grant. Another champion of the ecumenical movement.

𝐁𝐢𝐚𝐧𝐜𝐚 𝐎𝐥𝐭𝐡𝐨𝐟𝐟 – another pastor who is a big proponent of NAR and Dominion theology. She claims that where the Spirit of God is, there is “unity, prosperity, equality, and supernaturally.”

Because of these many red flags, I cannot recommend the IF: Gathering. It’s simply bound to push social justice, ecumenism, and the NAR movement. Please note that because of limited space, the information above is very basic. I could’ve written an entire post about each person. I encourage you to research on your own and feel free to comment or contact me for resources. Compare what you find with the Word of God. I’m not judging the heart or motivation of any of these speakers. I’m not saying they’ve never said anything true or helpful. I’m simply bringing to light the many concerns associated with them so that you can make a wise choice and help other women in your circle do the same. I pray that it is helpful and encourages you to stand firm on the rock of God’s Truth even when everyone else is stumbling off the edge.

 

(The above was written by my oldest daughter, Jess, and originally posted on her Anchor for the Soul pages at Instagram and Facebook.)

 

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